Pineapple-black bean enchiladas (8-10 servings)

enchiladas.jpg

Every now and again, I make a recipe whose title alone triggers salivation when I remember just how good it was. This Food.com contribution was definitely one of those. I found the recipe a few months ago and bookmarked it, but I wasn't sure how well the flavors would work together. In the end, the beans and pineapple were a lovely sweet-tangy combination, and they were complemented by the tomatoey enchilada sauce and the mildly hot chilies. This is a nice recipe to make when you haven't got any fresh produce on hand!

You will need:

  • 2 tsp vegetable oil
  • 1 large yellow onion, diced
  • 1 medium bell pepper, diced
  • 20-oz can crushed pineapple, drained with 1/3 cup juice reserved
  • 15-oz can black beans, drained and rinsed
  • 4.5-oz can chopped green chilies, undrained
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro (I used a few tablespoons of dried)
  • 3 cups shredded cheddar cheese
  • 8-10 oz red or green enchilada sauce (Rick Bayless' green chile enchilada sauce is the bessssst!)
  • 8-10 flour tortillas (8 or 9-inch)
  • sour cream (opt.)

Steps:

  1. Preheat oven to 350 F. Spray a 13x9-inch glass baking dish with non-stick spray and set aside.
  2. Heat oil over medium heat in a large rimmed skillet. Add onion and pepper; cook until soft. Stir in pineapple, black beans, chilies, and salt. Stir until heated through; remove from skillet. Stir in cilantro and 2 cups of the cheese.
  3. If needed, warm up the tortillas to make them more pliable. Spoon a tablespoon of the enchilada sauce onto each tortilla, and then top that with about 3/4 cup of the black bean mixture. Roll up the tortilla, folding down the ends as you go, and place it seam side-down in the baking dish. Repeat with remaining tortillas, squeezing them into a tight row.
  4. In a small bowl, mix the remaining enchilada sauce and the pineapple juice together, and then pour it over top the enchiladas. Sprinkle the remaining cup of cheese over that. Cover the baking dish with non-stick foil and seal tightly.
  5. Bake 30 minutes, uncover, and bake another 5-10 minutes. The cheese should be melted and the sauce should be bubbly. Top each enchilada with sour cream and more cilantro, if desired.

The enchiladas took a little time to put together, but it was so worth it. While they were baking, they smelled so wonderful that I was convinced I was going to eat two; however, they were filling enough that I could make it through only one! Luckily, they heated up quite well in the microwave the next day.

The original recipe uses pineapple tidbits, but I accidentally bought crushed instead. I think it was actually better that way though, because the pineapple blended in well with the filling. I'll probably do that again next time.

Two notes: Sometimes I add in leftover cooked rice I need to use up, and I've found that's a great way to stretch out the filling. A handful of sun-dried tomatoes (not the oil-packed kind) make a nice addition too! Also, in recent months, as I've become less and less tolerant of onions and peppers, I've been skipping those fresh veggies and subbing in onion powder and a sprinkling of Mt. Elbert seasoning, which contains both onion and bell pepper. If you have to do the same, I really don't think it makes a difference in flavor!